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First-Ever Cooks for Kids Benefits Needy School Children

First-ever Cooks for Kids benefits needy schoolchildren


Randy Orwig, senior pastor at Elon Community Church, is painfully aware of the fact there are children who go without proper nutrition when school’s out of session.

Randy’s wife, Beverly, is a seventh-grade language arts teacher at Turrentine Middle School and she has seen firsthand how a few days off can impact children who receive free and/or reduced lunch.

“Following the bad winter we had, a lot of kids were out of school and some of these kids, we discovered, went without meals,” he said.

Sixty percent of the 23,000 students enrolled in the Alamance-Burlington School System (ABSS) are enrolled in the free and/ or reduced lunch plan this year; that’s a 3 percent increase from last year, said Danielle Woodall, lead school social worker for ABSS.

“As a community, we can do better than this,” Orwig added.

The Alamance County Backpack Program provides nonperishable meals to schoolchildren on the weekends, holidays and other days when they may not be able to receive a hot meal. Elon Community Church is involved in the program but Orwig said, “we had some church members who were very moved by the fact this is a real need in our community and they wanted to do something.”

Bob Martin, May’s Cook of the Month and an area attorney, attends Elon Community Church and pitched the idea to the Times-News of uniting the Cooks of the Month for an event to benefit the Alamance County Backpack Program.

Cooks For Kids will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 24 in the Community Life Center at Elon Community Church, 271 N. Williamson Ave., Elon, and is presented by the church and the Times-News.

Food will be prepared by current and former Cooks of the Month including Eddie Boswell, Anita Davis, Times-News $2 Dinners columnist Penny Hawkins, Rebekah Barringer Kaczmarek, Times-News classified inside sales consultant Angel Little, Bob and Connie Martin, Susan Osborne, Debbi Kennerson-Webb and members of the Alamance Community College Culinary Department.

The Haw River Pleasure and Social Club will perform and Martin said “there will be presenters and videos about the problem of food insecurity in Alamance County.”

Tickets are $14 (pays for one weekend of food for two children); $28 (pays for a month of food for one child) and $56 (pays for a month of food for two children). Tickets can be purchased at Fired Up Pizza, 3243 S. Church St., Burlington; Roasted Coffee Depot, 131 W. Elm St., Graham; Tickle My Ribs, 1183 University Drive, Burlington and the Times-News, 707 S. Main St., Burlington.

Woodall said the selection process for participants in the backpack program is done in a discreet and confidential way.

“There’s a lot of need,” Woodall said.

Funds, Orwig said, will go to seed money for churches to establish their own backpack ministries for area schoolchildren.

“This is a community-wide event and we welcome support from other churches and the community,” he said. “This city and area is a patchwork of care and we’re getting the chance to come together and help each other. We’re hoping this seed money will help us get full coverage of as many schools as we can.”

For more details on Cooks For Kids, call (336) 584-0391 or text “KIDS” to (336) 656-2022.

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Weight Watchers Open House at Faculty Wellness Center

Unknown-1Looking to lose some weight before the hot summer months, but don’t know where to start? Join us for the Weight Watchers open house at 12:45 p.m. on Wednesday, April 29 at 301 South O’Kelly Ave. This event is free for all faculty and staff. Contact Belinda Day with any questions.

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Neuroscience Day at Elon

images-1Join the Neuroscience Club for an exciting day of neuroscience-themed events around Elon’s campus on Monday, May 4.

Students and faculty will have the opportunity to engage Dr. Adam Kaplin, a scientist and physician visiting from Johns Hopkins, during the day on Monday.

Later on, be sure to visit a meet and greet in the LaRose Digital Theater followed by two guest speakers on health and neurological disease, Craig Edwards of Burlington and Dr. Kaplin from Hopkins.

Don’t miss this incredible opportunity to learn about the biggest mystery of all – the human brain.


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Acupuncture Healing Center Workshop

unnamedThis workshop from the Acupuncture Healing Center in Chapel Hill is the perfect way to shed some extra pounds!

The workshop will include:
– 3 classes that will teach about Wood, the element of the season in Chinese medicine, and the diets that supports this season.
– Acupuncture treatments, at the end of each class, to curb cravings and aid in detoxification.
– Reduce cravings and reduce stress through changes in diet.
– Learn recipes attuned to the spring season.
– 3 weeks of individual and group support in your nutritional and
healing needs; this I have found to be one of the most beneficial
components of the workshop!

Workshops Dates: Thursday April 16, April 30 and May 7
Time: 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Cost: $35 non-refundable, due at registration.
Spots are limited, so reserve soon!

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12th Annual Family Caregiver & Senior Resource Fair

imgresIt’s that time of year again! The 12th Annual Family Caregiver & Senior Resource Fair is just around the corner. Please click here to access detailed information about registration. Print the ad, choose which mini session you would like to attend and mail the ad back to Alamance ElderCare.

If you choose to you can also scan it into the computer and email it to or fax is also an option at (336) 538-8577.

We hope to see you there!

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Take a LIMO to your next mammogram!

image002Women’s Health- Breast Cancer Screening

Event Date: Wednesday, April 8

Event Location: Alamance Regional Medical Center, Norville Breast Center

Click here to register.

This is a fun way to get your mammogram done and take a Limo ride with your friends. You will be picked up at the Wellness Center parking lot by a beautiful limo and chauffeured to Alamance Regional Medical Center for your mammogram, and returned to Elon within 1 1/2 hours. The limo can accommodate groups of 8, so bring your co-workers and make it a party!

You qualify for this program if you have not had a mammogram within the past year.

Mammograms are covered under Elon’s health insurance (Blue Cross Blue Shield) so there is no charge.
If you are covered under a different insurance you may wish to check with them to determine your coverage.
Most insurance companies cover a screening mammogram at 100% for preventive care.

Your physician may fax your screening mammogram order to 336-278-5122 or you can mail it with your paperwork.
You may also schedule an appointment at Elon Wellness for a breast exam and mammogram order.

Any questions, please feel free to call ext. 5569.

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Borrow these life-changing reads from the Wellness Center

RenewalThe Mother’s Guide to Self-Renewal: How to Reclaim, Rejuvenate and Re-Balance Your Life by Renée Peterson Trudeau

Mothers of all ages can take control of their lives again with this valuable year-long guide. Many women feel overwhelmed and out of touch after giving birth to their children. This guide, organized into monthly themes, will help you renew your commitment to yourself—as a unique individual and as a mother.


Good Night Sleep

Good Night: The Sleep Doctor’s 4-Week Program to Better Sleep and Better Health by Michael Breus

This life changing Amazon Top 100 Best Seller offers a step-by-step plan to remedy your restless nights. Written by sleep expert Michael Breus, this book offers both immediate solutions to your bad sleeping habits and a 4-week program to help you develop a rejuvenating sleep schedule. If you regularly feel sleep-deprived or worn out, this book is a must-read!

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Natural Triad Health, Wellness and Green Living Show Saturday, April 18


Mark your calendars! Don’t miss this great opportunity to jumpstart a healthy lifestyle. The show offers hundreds of booths with wellness products and services, door prizes and your favorite local TV and radio personalities. We hope to see you there!

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Prediabetes Resource for Elon Faculty and Staff

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“Prediabetes: What You Need to Know”

This class is offered every other month in the Grand Oaks Center Large Classroom on the campus of Alamance Regional Medical Center.

This two-hour class is for people diagnosed with pre-diabetes or for people who are at risk of developing diabetes. The focus of the class is on understanding the factors that contribute to developing diabetes and
how to prevent or slow the progression of Type 2 diabetes by making healthy lifestyle changes. The class is taught by a registered dietitian and registered nurse and focuses on nutrition, weight management, diet, exercise and behavioral changes.

The cost of the class is $30. A limited number of scholarships are available.

For information on the next available class date and time, call (336) 586-4000 or go online to

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15 Natural Cold and Flu Remedies

Feeling under the weather? Read these 15 Natural Cold and Flu Remedies and get back to being a healthier, happier you!

It’s no wonder natural cold and flu remedies are popular — modern medicine has yet to offer a cure for these age-old ailments. While some medications can prevent and shorten the flu’s duration, some medications only offer temporary relief of symptoms. Many natural remedies provide temporary relief as well, and a few may actually help you get better. See which cold and flu remedies show the most promise.

Echinacea is an herbal supplement that is believed to boost the immune system to help fight infections. But it’s unclear whether this boost helps fight off colds. Most evidence shows echinacea doesn’t help prevent a cold, but some research shows it decreases symptoms by a day or two. Others show it has no effect. To try it, take echinacea when symptoms start and continue for 7 to 10 days. If you have a medical condition or take medication, check with your doctor before taking any supplement.

Some studies show that zinc appears to have effects against viruses, like the cold. There is some evidence the mineral may prevent the formation of certain proteins that cold viruses use to reproduce themselves. While zinc does not appear to help prevent colds, some research suggests it may help shorten cold symptom duration and reduce the severity of the common cold when taken within 24 hours of the first symptoms. The FDA recommends against using zinc nasal products for colds because of reports of permanent loss of smell.

The cold-fighting prowess of vitamin C remains uncertain. Some studies suggest it can help reduce the duration of cold symptoms by about a day. In one study, participants who were exposed to extreme physical stress and cold weather and who took vitamin C were 50% less likely to get a cold. To help stem a cold, 2,000 milligrams seems to work best, but this high dose may cause diarrhea and stomach upset.

Grandma was onto something. Chicken soup may help cold symptoms in more than one way. Inhaling the steam can ease nasal congestion. Sipping spoonfuls of fluid can help avoid dehydration. And some advocates say the soup may soothe inflammation. Researchers have found chicken soup has anti-inflammatory properties in the lab, though it’s unclear whether this effect translates to real-world colds.

Drinking hot tea offers some of the same benefits as chicken soup. Inhaling the steam relieves congestion, while swallowing the fluid soothes the throat and keeps you hydrated. Black and green teas have the added bonus of being loaded with disease-fighting antioxidants, which may fight colds.

The hot toddy is an age-old nighttime cold remedy. Since you won’t want to drink black tea before bed, make a cup of hot herbal tea. Add a teaspoon of honey, a small shot of whiskey or bourbon, and a squeeze of lemon. This mixture may ease congestion, soothe the throat and help you sleep. Limit yourself to one hot toddy. Too much alcohol can disrupt sleep.

Garlic has long been touted for legendary germ-fighting abilities. One study showed garlic supplements may help prevent colds when taken daily. However, more research is needed to determine garlic’s real effects. But garlic is very nutritious. In addition, it can help spice up your meals when a stuffy nose makes everything taste bland.

For a heavy dose of steam, use a room humidifier — or simply sit in the bathroom with the door shut and a hot shower running. Breathing in steam can break up congestion in the nasal passages, offering relief from a stuffy or runny nose.

Dripping or spraying saltwater into the nose can thin out nasal secretions and help remove excess mucus, while reducing congestion. Try over-the-counter saline drops, or make your own by mixing 8 ounces of warm water with 1/4 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon baking soda. Use a bulb syringe to squirt the mixture into one nostril while holding the other one closed. Repeat 2-3 times and then do the other side.

You can use the same DIY saline solution in a neti pot. This small ceramic pot is used to flush out the nasal passages with a saltwater solution — a process known as nasal irrigation. The result is thinner mucus that drains more easily. Research suggests neti pots are useful in relieving sinus symptoms, such as congestion, pressure, and facial pain, particularly in patients with chronic sinus troubles.

Days of wiping and blowing your nose can leave the skin around your nostrils sore and irritated. A simple remedy is to dab a menthol-infused ointment under, but not in, the nose or on the chest or throat. Menthol has mild numbing agents that can relieve the pain of raw skin. As an added benefit, breathing in the medicated vapors that contain menthol or camphor may help relieve cough or open clogged passages and ease symptoms of congestion. Use only in children over 2 years of age.

For a sore throat, the traditional saltwater gargle may have some merit. Gargling warm water with a teaspoon of salt four times daily may help keep a scratchy throat moist.

Another strategy for relieving nighttime congestion is to try over-the-counter nasal strips. These are strips of tape worn on the bridge of the nose to open the nasal passages. While they can’t unclog the nose, they do create more space for airflow.

A fever is the original natural remedy. The rise in temperature actively fights colds and flu by making your body inhospitable for germs. However, if your fever is making you uncomfortable, it’s fine to take something to reduce it. And be sure to stay well hydrated. Call your doctor right away if the fever is over 104, unless it comes down quickly with treatment. In infants 3 months or younger call your doctor for any fever greater than 100.4. Children with a fever of less than 102 usually don’t require treatment unless they’re uncomfortable.

With our busy lives, most of us loathe to spend a day or two under the covers. But getting plenty of rest lets your body direct more energy to fighting off germs. Staying warm is also important, so tuck yourself in and give your immune cells a leg up in their noble battle.

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