Examining Heroes WT 2013

Strager MLK XC

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere”–Martin Luther King Jr.

This quote is written in the beginning of Martin Luther King Jr.s “Letters From a Birmingham Jail”. Unfortunately this quote is still pertinent today and will be until there are no more injustices in the world. Overcoming injustice in one society is only one small victory for the larger problem at hand. A present day example would be same-sex marriage. Although marrying someone of the same sex is legal in parts of the United States, justice has still not been served on a national level. If one is gay and wants to marry someone of the same sex they either have to move to a different state or wait until the law changes. The victories that states like Massachusetts and just recently Washington and Maryland have achieved, although great, mean nothing for those living in the rest of the country. Additionally, because there are so few states that allow same-sex marriage, they live in jeopardy of having their law overturned until allowing same-sex marriage is passed nationwide, like we saw occurred in California. Until we as a country standardize this law we still have a long battle of injustice to fight. 

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sarahlittle XC blog

“We who engage in nonviolent direct action are not the creators of tension. We merely bring to the surface the hidden tension that is already alive.” (Letter from the Birmingham Jail)

This quote from the famous Martin Luther King Jr. really moves me. This is from his famous 1963 “Letter from the Birmingham Jail,” written after his Good Friday arrest for marching without a permit to break the unjust segregation laws. It brings thoughts of how difficult that era in particular was and how strong he must have been to be able to sacrifice everything in the name of racial equality. As a preacher, MLK was never short of words, but always spoke with a humility that moved millions. This quote divulges how nonviolent direct action is not the creator of problems or strain within people, but it shows the previous tension that had appeared before an act of nonviolent action. As the leader for the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King Jr. was truly an inspiration and easily one of the most beloved heroes in our history who created such great change for such a severe price and will forever be in our hearts as one of the bravest men to have ever walked this planet.

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kmiller blog 11

My favorite hero that we talked about is William Wallace. I have always loved the movie Braveheart, and think that William Wallace encompasses aspects of many different types of hero. He is a folk hero, a soldier, and an anti-hero in many ways and can relate to almost all the other heroes we discussed. I also like the fact that he is a combination of brain an braun. Whereas many heroes are revered for one aspect (Oedipus had his mind, Achilles was a great warrior) William Wallace was both a great warrior and well educated. His whole story from start to finish follows the idea of a monomyth perfectly.

In the first blog I talked about Monk as a hero. After reflecting on this I still believe he is a hero. Though he always suffered from OCD, it did not become debilitating until his wife died. His early life accounts for the hyper attentiveness that he possesses, and he is often able to overcome his fears to carry out his task. Monk is a cultural hero because he is only really known in the culture of San-Francisco. Though there are certain aspects of the perfect monomyth that are missing from Monk’s story, all in all he follows a hero’s path.

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Strager Hero Final

One of my favorite heroes that we discussed in class was V from V for Vendetta. He was a very meticulous and thoughtful character, which added to his complexities. I also really enjoyed the movie’s different uses of symbolism throughout characters and character development.

I think it would be interesting to add the movie “Pay it Forward” to the curriculum to show how young children can be just as impactful as older men who have more power and sources.

The monomyth could be applied to my hero from my initial blog entry  about Joe from the documentary Craigslist Joe. Joe ventures out into the world with only the clothes on his back, a tooth brush and tooth paste, a backpack, a laptop, a cell phone with no phone contacts and a camera man he met off of craigslist. He embarks on the journey to learn if our society is still interconnected or if we fail at connecting to those around us because we are too consumed with technology. On his journey he learns that there is still hope in humanity as he meets many different people along the way who aid him by providing food, shelter and simple company. He connects best with a cultural hero because this journey would not be possible if we lived in a different time or society. He tried to change our society or at least the way we see it by bringing back his first-hand knowledge of the great people who live among us. He and the many he met along the way are all heroes.

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JVonick Blog 11

It’s hard to think we could cover so many heroes in just three weeks, but we got it done. From Antigone to Beowulf to Rick Blaine in Casablanca, all of the heroes we covered have unique personality traits that qualify them as heroes. However, two of my favorite characters from the course would probably be Gawain from Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Atticus Finch from To Kill a Mockingbird. Gawain did everything extremely brave and courageously, and he didn’t boast about it at all. I have a lot of respect for people who are modest about what they’re good at (for example, modest athletes) and Gawain was a true hero because he took on the challenge of the Green Knight because it was the right thing to do. For Atticus, I admire his courage and bravery for sticking up for the innocent man. Tom Robinson was an African American and defending him meant going against the town’s beliefs, but Atticus stayed strong. While he didn’t win the case, for me, it was the thought and effort that counts.

My first blog post was about how I would be similar to John Blake in The Dark Knight Rises because I’m caring and love helping others. Blake’s trail is a little different than both Gawain and Atticus, but all three of them share two crucial trait in a hero: selfless and brave. All three of them had intentions of doing good not for themselves, but for the people around them, and were fearless about doing so. Gawain didn’t fight the Green Knight for himself: he did it for the King and the others. Atticus defended Tom Robinson not for his own image, but because it was the right thing to do. Like Atticus, Blake wanted to help save the city for the people, not for his own pride and fame.

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Diversity event Extra Credit

I went to Kip Fulbecks diversity program held in Whitely on January 16th.  Fulbeck discussed his racial obstacles.  He was Chinese and Caucasian and was always made fun of as the Chinese kid.  He never understood why people wouldn’t accept that he was multi-racial.  In Fulbecks family he was considered the white one since he looked mostly American in comparison to his other family members, but at school he was the only Chinese boy.  Fulbecks talks about his struggles so he decided to change society.

 

Fulbeck created a term called ‘Hapa’ meaning half-breed.  He wanted everyone who went under the same scrutiny as him to know that they are not alone.  He created a book and filled a museum of his findings. To no surprise they were many that felt the same way he did.

 

He goes on to talk about the purpose and meaning of tattoos and how meaningful they can be.  Fulbeck really emphasized being comfortable and confident in your own skin.

 

kip

I believe that everyone should be happy with the way they are, we are all blessed.  Regardless size, shape, or ethnicity we are all human and that’s important to remember when you stereotype and criticize.

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Jordans Final Credits Post

My favorite heroes that we discussed were Melba from the Little Rock 9, Bonnie and Clyde and Martin Luther King Junior. I thought all three of these heroes had great stories. I think the violence that the Melba and the Little Rock 9 had to endure was sad but fascinating. I also thought that the Little Rock 9’s youth made them very unique and interesting; it takes a lot of courage to do what they did as teenagers. I also really enjoyed the story of Bonnie and Clyde. I liked how Bonnie and Clyde were somewhat villains and heroes at the same time. Although they robbed and killed they still managed to affect people positively. Martin Luther King Junior was also another one of my favorite heroes. One of the biggest things that stand about him to me was his commitment to peaceful and non-violent protest and gatherings. Throughout all the negative feedback and assassination attempts he never got out of character and stuck to his plan eventually making a huge difference in America.

I would like to discuss more sports heroes. I really like the hero Coach Boone in the film Remember the Titans.  Coach Boone is played by Denzel Washington and in my opinion he does a great job. Also the film is a great movie and has a great story. Coach Boone fights adversity to bring his white and black players together, while the community tries to keep the teammates apart.

My first blog post was about the hero batman. I think batman’s story can be applied to the definition of a monomyth. Batman’s wild adventures and encounters with super villains fit the criteria. Batman defeats these many super villains without having superpowers. Batman is an anti-hero although he does good and protects the city he is seen as a villain to some people in Gotham City. We also feel sorry for batman because of where he comes from and all he’s done for Gotham and his connection to Gotham, without getting the praise he deserves.

 

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CEdwards BP_11 “Final Credits”

When I received the syllabus for this course, I can honestly say that it was not what I expected. I registered for this course because I love superheroes like Batman and Spiderman but when I saw Oedipus on the agenda, I honestly thought I made the wrong decision.  However, this class has completely enhanced my view of heroes. Through this course, I was introduced to different characters, fictitious and non-fictitious, that I was not privy to. Two of my favorite heroes discussed throughout this course were Melba Patillo Beals, author of Warriors Don’t Cry, and Atticus Finch from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird.

I had knowledge of the events that occurred in Little Rock during 1957; however, Melba’s memoir was eye opening. I learned a great deal historically from her story, but I also learned more about what it meant to be a hero. Melba and the Little Rock Nine are such an interesting group to evaluate because their bravery, determination, and greater understanding of the world around them at such a young age are phenomenal traits. I was just in such awe of her actions and her journey throughout integrating Central High. With my mom being born during that era, this story has made me ask her more questions to further my knowledge. I do not know if I would be able to have done what Melba and her counterparts did but I am glad that they did it. Additionally, I was so excited to finally have the opportunity to read To Kill a Mockingbird in this course because I had only heard of how great it was. Atticus Finch was a noble hero and very honorable. Atticus was admirable because of lessons that he taught Scout and Jem were very unconventional, given their setting. He was very heroic for defending a black man during that time but yet did not waiver in his resolve.

The hero I discussed in my first blog was Jean Gray from the X-Men series. Compared to my two favorite heroes from this course, Melba and Atticus, Jean is not as heroic as I originally thought. In retrospect, the concept of monomyth cannot be applied to her. While she sacrifices her life for her love just as many heroes we discussed sacrificed themselves to protect someone else, Jean does not reach a point of self-discovery. Her alter ego, Phoenix, is not always defending the greater good. Thus, Jean is consistently inconsistent with her heroic tendencies. Compared to Atticus and Melba, who really changed their environments for the better, I would no longer consider Jean to be a hero.

I would like to see Batman be incorporated into the mandatory course material since his story encompasses many of the important items we discussed throughout the course.

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Whitehead Final Blog

The hero that I wish would have been talked about more is Batman.  I believe him to be a great hero in more ways than one.  He sacrifices himself for the city, he becomes the “bad man” for the sake of the city.” All in all he cares about the city more than his own reputation.   He sacrifices everything for the city and to make sure that the people of it are safe.  Initially, he is secluded to isolated Asia to learn his fighting techniques and what he is fighting for.  In the final movie, he must remember this and dig deep within himself in order to save the city.  Throughout his troubles he kind of forgets who he is and what he is fighting for.  To win, he must engage his inner darkness and use his full soul in order to beat Bain.

The first hero I wrote about was indeed Batman.  Like I said I think he is a perfect example of a hero.  The most recent trilogy really puts him into a modern sense and make shim more realistic in someways.  In the end I really like how he truly sacrifices himself and has to rediscover himself to beat the “bad guy” and win the city back for safety.

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JVonick XC Blog MLK

http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/images/2010/0118/0118-aking-martin-luther-king-jr-full.jpg/7233544-1-eng-US/0118-AKING-MARTIN-LUTHER-KING-JR-full.jpg_full_600.jpg

 

“Nonviolence means avoiding not only external physical violence but also internal violence of spirit. You not only refuse to shoot a man, but you refuse to hate him.”

 

Everyone knows that Martin Luther King Jr. is the definition of a hero and leader. Similar to another famous hero, Gandhi, King led by example, but even saying that is an understatement. When most people are angry or sad, they let the anger get the best of them and negatively impact their actions. King responded to the social injustice by being peaceful and nonviolent in his actions. That’s why this quote is so fitting: it’s obvious that nonviolence has to avoid violent actions, but it includes verbal abuse and, as he says “spiritual” abuse.

Unfortunately, this quote and meaning hasn’t had the impact he would have wanted. There are definitely people in this world that have tried problem solving by peace, whether it’s from his quote or some other way, and one example is Nelson Mandela. Mandela was an anti-apartheid activist in South Africa after spending 27 years in prison. Mandela and MLK both went against popular opinion and belief (although they were doing the right thing, similar to Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird.) The reason why they were unique, however, was because of their attempt to do it nonviolently. They never wanted anyone to act by retaliating, and they were also positive when speaking about others and didn’t try to personally insult anyone.

Nowadays, many people come out against bullying, mentally and physically, and that’s great. But it’s unfortunate that violent mental and physical actions are still the result of anger and sadness. Not saying it’s easy to control yourself, but maybe the whole world needs to hear this quote again to realize that what they say to someone could really hurt them. King’s impact and good for the United States was truly too impactful to understand, and this quote is a good example of that.

 

I believe MLK’s quote above is from his last speech on April 3rd, 1968 at the Church of God of Christ in Memphis, Tennessee. I got it from http://www.famous-quotes.me/nonviolence-means-avoiding-not-only-external-physical-violence-but-also-internal-violence-of-spirit-you-not-only-refuse-to-shoot-a-man-but-you-refuse-to-hate-him/

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