Category Archives: Blog 9 “Kings & Leaders” (Jan 16-17)

Kmeyerhoff Blog 9

Matthew Shepard was a student at the University of Wyoming who was murdered for being openly gay.  Matthew was killed by two peers that brought him to a remote area and proceeded to torture him.  During the process of torturing him, they tied him to a fence where they left him to die.  Matthew Shepard’s death was a hate crime against gays.  His story is known worldwide and is shown in the movie The Laramie Project.

During Matthew’s funeral, the leader of a church in Kansas brought a hate group to protest his funeral.  They brought signs that said things such as “No Tears for Queers” and “Fat Matt in Hell”.  There was also another protest group that appeared at Matthew’s funeral to protest the hate group.  One of Matthew’s friends organized a group of people who wore white robes and giant wings while surrounding the anti-gay group.

This whole situation makes me very upset.  It is scary to see how violent people can get over the personal choices of another human being.  I think it is disgusting that anti-gay groups were protesting this funeral.  I don’t think they had the right to do that and found it to be very wrong.  I felt that the other protesters did an amazing thing by going in and protecting Matthew in the only way they could.  The true injustice that was happening was the disrespect people had for his funeral and his friends dressing as angels to stop them was a great act.

http://ehis.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=4&sid=6c7da6c2-1eb4-41dd-aa2e-eb2fd7240afc%40sessionmgr14&hid=4

 

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Dwarrick Blog 9

The Middle Eastern Reporter summarizes the civilian press of Egyptian military to evoke emergency laws and Hosni Mubarak’s power in Egypt in a general recollection of events. “Reclaiming the Revolution” was the name given to the protests of 2011 in Egypt. Activists joined together in downtown Cairo to protest against their leader Hosni Mubarak. Mubarak had given himself too much power over the country which was negatively affecting the people and was in the process of being revoked by military leaders. The demonstration was to help speed up this process to give the power back to the civilians of Egypt, but there is still a worry that the upcoming elections will allow too many of Mubarak’s cronies to get back into office. The people want a fair election due to the past elections being corrupt and fixed. Civilians are tired of high unemployment and jobs with low wages. The government has let police and military have too much power leading to police brutalities that are not reprimanded. The civilians utilized social media sites such as Facebook to organize their protests before Mubarak had the internet shut down in response to their organization.

            This article did not shock me in the least. There are too many countries in the world today that do not have a grasp on their government and the justice their people deserve. There is definitely injustice occurring in this situation being that people have to live in fear of not being able to control their government. This is shown by the police brutality against innocent civilians that is not dealt with by the government. I do not believe the people are overreacting at all. They have every right to elect the leaders of their country who are going to better the lives of their people. The important part of this situation is that they showed no violence to anyone involved and they are heard for the right reasons. Their efforts did not go to waste. Mubarak would later step down and there would be a fair election of a new leader.

 

http://ehis.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=3&sid=793308a2-e17c-4234-b151-66901ce9f425%40sessionmgr12&hid=5

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CWhite27 Post 9 Kings & Leaders

 

In Chicago the city was engulfed with a public school strike that left over 350,000 children without classes. This made rising tensions nationally over teachers’ circumstances, placing the teachers’ union and the Mayor Rahm Emanuel in a tough, political standoff, which seemed to have no end. Thousands of teachers dressed in red made their way through downtown and marched outside the schools across the city, which is the nation’s third-largest school system. All of the parents were trying to find alternative care for their children because they still had to work during the strike.

This strike was the first in Chicago in over 25 years and the first in a major city in a half-dozen years. The strike made it stressful on the mayor Mr. Emanuel because he was a Democrat and former chief of staff to President Obama, which is his old hometown where the strike was taking place. The thing that brought up the biggest issue was he was afraid this might become an issue in the presidential election year when Democrats depend on the backing of labor.

There were negotiations going on until late Monday night between Chicago Public Schools and leaders of the Chicago Teachers Union. After a long time of negotiating they felt as if they needed a night to digest everything that was going on. Many labor groups and other teachers in surrounding cities gave the strikers their support, and they suggested that the fight in Chicago was a glimpse at a building national struggle over unionized teachers’ pay, conditions, benefits and standing.

This conflict had been simmering for months between the teachers and Mr. Emanuel. School Officials said they had made concessions in some contract talks about something that would amount to a 16% increase for teachers over four years despite what is expected to be a $1 billion deficit in the system’s operating budget next year. It is said that the average salary for teachers there is @76,000. But during the strike it was said the dispute was larger and included issues on benefits, calculating raises based on experience, training for teacher, and much more.

I think this protest was long coming. As my future job of becoming a teacher I know that I am looking at a salary of less than what I would want, but it has always been my dream job. I believe that teachers’ deserve to be paid way more than what they are currently receiving as well as they deserve better benefits too. I do not think this was an unnecessary strike because if someone says they are going to do something than it should take place. I think that this strike turned out to be much bigger than what was originally planned. It was talked about all around the nation and supported by many teachers from other places.

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CEdwards BP9_Kings and Leaders

 

On February 1, 1960, four young black men from the campus of North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University walked into Woolworths, a store and diner in downtown Greensboro, and sat and placed order for coffees. When David Richmond, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair Jr. (Jibreel Khazan), and Joe McNeill sat down at the lunch counter, they were told that they would not be served. The manager told them that this was a “white’s only” counter and that they would have to leave. Segregated lunch counters were commonplace in the South even after the 1954 Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. The four A&T freshman—who came to be known throughout history as the Greensboro Four– stayed at the counter until the close of the store that day. The next day more than twenty African-American students accompanied the four. Many times they were spat on, had food thrown at them, and were heckled with racial slurs. However, the students read their textbooks and sat quietly to distract themselves. Physical violence did not become a part of the protest.  On the third day, more than sixty students showed up from other area schools such as Bennett College. The fourth day saw crowds of supporters in the hundreds. The momentum of these sit-ins spread quickly. Soon sit-ins began in cities across the state such as Charlotte, Winston-Salem, Salisbury, and Raleigh. On July 26, 1960, Woolworth agreed to serve their first African-American patrons, their employees.

The Greensboro Four sat at the counter with a desire to be treated and served as equals. Centuries worth of unfair treatment is protest worthy, in my opinion.  The actions taken against them by the dissenters only added to the injustice that they were trying to conquer. By pouring milkshakes on their heads and spitting on them, the dissenters were extremely overreacting. In 2013, it is hard to fathom such responses to someone asking for a cup of coffee but it was that request stood for that enraged those who disagreed.  These men and their supporters were mentally unbreakable, an enviable attribute. In 1993, Woolworths closed and the International Civil Rights Center and Museum in downtown Greensboro was opened in the exact location. The feeling of standing near the actual bar stools located in Woolworths and knowing what they symbolize is indescribable.  This story has been told hundreds of times and with photos and videos from the actual protests, as well as, interviews with the four, I believe we have gotten the clearest picture of the events, save being actually present for them.

The implications of the actions of the Greensboro Four were monumental. Ella Baker brought together leaders of various citizens together for a conference and consequently the Student Non-Violence Coordinating Committee was born. The sit in is said to have been a catalyst in the American Civil Rights era. Four years later, the Civil Rights Act was passed which made segregated public place unlawful.

http://ncpedia.org/history/20th-Century/greensboro-four

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benjaminsummers post 9

dek

One of the more recent protests that came to mine was the Occupy Wall Street protest.  The people who played a part in this protest believe that the current economy was treating them unjustly.  The protest was against economic inequality and corporate greed.  The movement began in September and I think is still going, but with much less media coverage than it did when it started.  This is where the “We are the 99%” chant started, which shows that class warfare is part of this movement.  The protestors feel that they are being cheated, economically, by big businesses.  They also believe that the bankers and finance industries do not properly represent them.  The protestors further believe that what is beneficial for Wall Street is not in the best interest for the country.  Part of the belief of the movement is also that the large corporations have too much sway on the politicians, which is said to causes economic inequality.

When I look at this movement, I see a lot of people who are not happy about the current economic system and their place in it.  The people who are part of the movement want something done that will change the status quo.  I also see some areas that are illogical; one of these is the demand for the minimum wage to be $20 and hour.  That kind of demand will never happen and took away from the power of the movement.

http://relooney.fatcow.com/0_New_11478.pdf

 

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Jordans Blog Post 9

The protests against injustice I chose to research are the protests regarding the shooting of seventeen year old Trayvon Martin in February of last year. The shooting took place in Sanford, Florida where the unarmed teen was murdered when he was killed by the twenty eight year old George Zimmerman.  Zimmerman saw Martin walking in his neighborhood, quickly calling the police claiming the teen look suspicious walking in the neighborhood.   Soon after calling the police Zimmerman left his vehicle, stating that he and Martin then became in a violent altercation. The altercation led to Martin being shot and killed, while Zimmerman claimed self-defense and was questioned he was not charged initially. This caused uproar around the country, many people felt that Zimmerman should have been prosecuted for the Murder of Trayvon Martin. Protestors also saw flaws within Florida’s “Stand Your  Ground Law” a law permitting the use of force without an obligation to retreat first. Prortestors around the United States paid their respects to the fallen teen by wearing hoodies with their hoods up over their heads which was the way Trayvon was wearing his on the day he was shot. Zimmerman was eventually detained and charged with second degree murder for Martins death. He was awarded bail and his trial is set for June of this year.

In my opinion this was a protest worthy event. There are numerous questions that can be  asked regarding this situation. What if Trayvon had been a teen of a different race? Would Zimmerman had gotten off so easily for his murder? Is it truly self-defense if the person claiming self-defense is the individual with the weapon and approaches the person he or she claims they were defending themselves from? I do not believe the protestors were overreacting at all, a murder of a young teen should never be brushed aside as this case almost was. I also don’t believe that the entire clear, concise story has not been completely told by any newspaper or news station. I feel that this case definitely should be examined again and that Zimmerman should serve jail time for the murder of Trayvon Martin.

 

 

http://news.yahoo.com/trayvon-martins-mother-urges-florida-repeal-self-defense-221609977.html

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Aly Quintana Blog #9

Having grown up in South Florida and being of Cuban decent, I sometimes have a completely different perspective of political issues as they relate to Cuba and immigration. When thinking about a protest against injustice, the name Elian comes to mind. Elian was a just a year younger than I was, or six years old, when he was found three miles off the coast of Florida in an inner tube and surrounded by dolphins.  Elian and two others were the only survivors when a group of 14 escaped from Cuba.  Elian’s mother was among those who perished at sea. So here is the essence of the five months of chaos and controversy that plagued the city of Miami:  in a normal situation, if a visitor were travelling to the U.S. and there was an accident where the parent of a small child perished, that child would be returned back to its sole surviving parent who would rightfully have custody and make any decisions regarding that child. Everyone would be ok with this and be demanding, in fact, that the child be returned as quickly as possible to his surviving parent…unless of course, that father lived in Cuba and you were a Cuban American living in South Florida. So what is the difference? The difference, according to many in the Cuban American community, is that the child’s mom risked her life and that of her son to free them from dictatorship and the horrible conditions that exist in Cuba. In addition, Cuban Americans, who are very aware of the Castro tactics of coercion, use of fear and propaganda, were convinced that the child’s father had been coerced by the Cuban government into requesting that his son be returned to him.

After many conversations between the U.S. Dept. of Justice and the child’s father, it was decided that the child would be returned to Cuba.  This is where things got complicated, scary actually.  Cubans began to protest against Elian’s return.  It no longer had to do with Elian but it turned into Cuban Americans vs. Castro. Cuban Americans, who are considered one of the most successful immigrant groups in the U.S. history, expected the U.S. government to back them up in a sort of “bigger picture” perspective. The protest was about an immigrant’s rights when fleeing an oppressive government. Cubans felt entitled to U.S. support because they believed they had not only contributed successfully to the economy but had been true supporters of the American government and life. In exchange, they believed the U.S. government owed them support. When Cubans vowed not to hand over Elian they threatened to paralyze Miami, its airport and ports. The county mayor stepped in, declared his support for the Cuban Americans and further declared that he would hold the Clinton administration personally responsible for any outbreak in violence. This action sparked an immediate outcry in the county as non- Cuban Americans took objection to the mayor’s show of support. This incident drew a wedge between Cuban Americans and the rest of the community and nation for that matter. The “Save Elian” campaign was the cause of multiple protests throughout the city. Cuban Americans held up Cuban and American flags, with some displayed upside down in anger for lack of support from the U.S. government. This angered everyone and Cuban Americans were seen as ungrateful; further igniting the immigration policy and suggesting that all Cubans be returned home.

The tension and controversy lasted for about five months and was finally resolved by force when on April 22nd, the INS stormed into the home where Elian was residing with his family and in a commando style tactical operation took the boy into custody. It was thought that the 2000 elections were impacted by this incident since blacks turned out in record numbers that year to vote for Al Gore. Cuban Americans also turned out in record numbers and voted overwhelmingly for Bush, who won Florida by a controversial few hundred votes. Perhaps it is because my parents and I were born and/or raised in the U.S.; but we did not necessary share the same views. While we felt the pain for the loss of the mother and her deep desires to give her son a better life, it was difficult from the perspective of a parent, to go against reuniting a child with his parent.  Additionally, I believe, if his father was truly a puppet of Castro and secretly wanted his son to enjoy his freedom in the U.S., and then he too could have opposed Castro and given his own life (since Castro would have either incarcerated him or killed him) for his son. So at the end, I think his father really didn’t care and sometimes you just need to respect a parent’s choice on how to raise his child despite your opinion on what is best for the child.

http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=3q7q1OMX6NYC&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&dq=elian+gonzalez+miami+protests&ots=jlFwQ0IY5d&sig=475f8XcF0iWG9m9m4ga_h94wMw8

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Naughton blog 9

 

 

Protests can come in all shapes an sizes and while this one might not seem as important as the stonewall riots for example, but stills hold merit, The protest of the Masters golf tournament and Augusta National Golf Club. To set the scene, since Augusta National Golf Club was first founded it only allowed and accepted men to be members. In 2003, lead by Marta Burk, the chair of the National Council of Women’s Organization at the time, people protested the 2003 Masters tournament to allow women into Augusta National. The protest got a lot of media coverage before the tournament. The protest actually ended up taking place down the road from Magnolia lane, the famed entrance to Augusta National. At the time the club chairman responded with the club may someday allow women into the club “but not at the point of a bayonet.” The protest fizzled out in 2003. And in 2012 that one-day came, ten years after the protest. Augusta National admitted its first women members, one of them being Condoleezza Rice.

 

While this protest was not a matter of life or death, like some can be. It was still important none-the-less. There are injustices on a big country scale and then there are injustices within niches, this was exactly that. But still worthy of protest for change.

 

 

 

 

 

http://content.usatoday.com/communities/gameon/post/2010/03/martha-burk-is-not-finished-with-augusta-or-tiger-woods/1#.UPg2OaFEODo

 

 

 

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sarahlittle blog 9

 Anti Saudi Govt Protest in Mecca , Buraidah

On December 31st 2011, tens of thousands of Saudi nationals staged a protest in the oil-rich Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia to condemn the recent killing of a teenage demonstrator. Protesters were calling for the downfall of the Saudi regime. Protesters have held a multitude of demonstrations on an almost regular basis in Saudi Arabia. They have been calling for the right for freedom of expression and assembly, an end to widespread discrimination, and the release of political prisoners. However, the demonstrations have turned into protests against the Al Saud regime, especially since November when security forces killed five protesters and injured many others.

Saudi Arabia has been under scrutiny for how they have been handling the anti-regimes for the past few years; specifically recently when protesters were killed by their security forces. I feel as if the people of the Eastern Province are not overreacting because of the fact that their protests were completely peaceful. They were occupying the streets and chanting with signs, but otherwise no violence ensued until security became involved. Granted I believe there is more than meets the eye when it comes to this controversy, I am appalled that a peaceful demonstration/protest became a murder site. I think that the events to follow will definitely be negative and the once peaceful protest will become a violent rebuttal of retribution. The only way I suppose these protests will end is with the people’s demand being met.

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VARGAS BLOG 9

For my blog I chose the February 15, 2003 anti-war protest.  This was a coordinated protest across the world where people expressed their opposition to the war in Iraq. Some sources say the number of people involved where between six and ten million that took up in sixty countries over the weekend of February 15th and 16th. The largest protests however, happened in Europe.  The protests in Rome included around three million people and is listed in the 2004 Guinness Book of World Records as the largest anti-war rally in history.  Madrid hosted the second largest with 1.5 million but in areas around China were the only places to not see much protests other than foreign students.

These protests started because in 2002, the United States government began to fight for the invading of Iraq.  George W. Bush gave the speech to the United Nations General Assembly on September 12, 2002.  A lot of people questioned the reasons behind the war and the U.S. government.  I found interesting that a poll which covered 41 countries claimed that less than 10% would support an invasion of Iraq without the UN sanction and that half would not support an invasion under any circumstances.

I feel like people in 2002 were not necessarily over-reacting but didn’t really fully understand the situation at its full. When people get the news that a country is going to be invaded, it spooks people, especially in other countries and they may think that another World War could possibly happen and from our histories, I don’t think anyone would want that to happen again.  At the time I was only nine years old and I didn’t really comprehend anything that was going on so it’s hard for me to side and sympathize with the people in that exact moment. At the time I do feel like the situation was more complicated than the media showed it out to be, the United States had just gotten attacked various times, and a possible terrorist group was up and coming and the Iraqi government wasn’t doing much to stop it.  It is a very controversial topic, whether we should have placed our troops in there or not even to this date. In the end however, the invasion of Iraq began on March 20, 2003 despite the thousands of anti-war protests held around the globe.

 

http://www.socialistworker.co.uk/article.php?article_id=3323

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