CEdwards BP_11 “Final Credits”

When I received the syllabus for this course, I can honestly say that it was not what I expected. I registered for this course because I love superheroes like Batman and Spiderman but when I saw Oedipus on the agenda, I honestly thought I made the wrong decision.  However, this class has completely enhanced my view of heroes. Through this course, I was introduced to different characters, fictitious and non-fictitious, that I was not privy to. Two of my favorite heroes discussed throughout this course were Melba Patillo Beals, author of Warriors Don’t Cry, and Atticus Finch from the novel To Kill a Mockingbird.

I had knowledge of the events that occurred in Little Rock during 1957; however, Melba’s memoir was eye opening. I learned a great deal historically from her story, but I also learned more about what it meant to be a hero. Melba and the Little Rock Nine are such an interesting group to evaluate because their bravery, determination, and greater understanding of the world around them at such a young age are phenomenal traits. I was just in such awe of her actions and her journey throughout integrating Central High. With my mom being born during that era, this story has made me ask her more questions to further my knowledge. I do not know if I would be able to have done what Melba and her counterparts did but I am glad that they did it. Additionally, I was so excited to finally have the opportunity to read To Kill a Mockingbird in this course because I had only heard of how great it was. Atticus Finch was a noble hero and very honorable. Atticus was admirable because of lessons that he taught Scout and Jem were very unconventional, given their setting. He was very heroic for defending a black man during that time but yet did not waiver in his resolve.

The hero I discussed in my first blog was Jean Gray from the X-Men series. Compared to my two favorite heroes from this course, Melba and Atticus, Jean is not as heroic as I originally thought. In retrospect, the concept of monomyth cannot be applied to her. While she sacrifices her life for her love just as many heroes we discussed sacrificed themselves to protect someone else, Jean does not reach a point of self-discovery. Her alter ego, Phoenix, is not always defending the greater good. Thus, Jean is consistently inconsistent with her heroic tendencies. Compared to Atticus and Melba, who really changed their environments for the better, I would no longer consider Jean to be a hero.

I would like to see Batman be incorporated into the mandatory course material since his story encompasses many of the important items we discussed throughout the course.

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  1. By CEdwards BP_11 on January 6, 2021 at 5:23 pm

    Sharika Folson

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  2. By My Homepage on March 20, 2021 at 11:32 pm

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