Mubarak Stepped Down…What’s Next?


Feb 21 2011

Mubarak Stepped Down…What’s Next?

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After 18 days of protests beginning on January 25, 2011, Hosni Mubarak resigned as President of Egypt on February 11, 2011. We have all heard this news in one form or another. But one thing that hasn’t been broadcasted too much is what will happen to Egypt (and the rest of the world, for that matter) post Mubarak.

Egyptian authorities are continuing to arrest numerous individuals on corruption charges. It seems as though before the country can work on creating peace, it must work on creating justice. Justice in this case would be arresting those government officials, including Mubarak, for their corruption and other crimes.

“The idea that there can be no lasting end to a conflict or no certainty a people can safely put the bitter experience of a dictatorship behind them without sooner or later bringing warlords, torturers, and tyrants to justice is now gospel in the human rights community and at the United Nations, and almost as widely accepted among the other major international actors.”

Some are confident that Egypt will not fail as a country after the occurrences in the beginning of 2011. Just a little more than a week after Mubarak’s resignation, some positive steps have been made towards recovery in Egypt. On Sunday, February 20, 2011, reports were announced that laws pertaining to detention without charges or trial would soon be ended. In addition, the judge in charge of constitutional amendments said his panel might soon make suggestions for a referendum to take place in the coming weeks. Furthermore, the very first political party was formed since the revolution, and the citizens of Egypt continue to demand reform.

“Choosing a regime will become the right of the people,” Ali Abdel-Fattah, a Muslim Brotherhood member. “The nature of the regime will be decided by elections. And I think Egyptians agree on the demands and how to realize them.”

Protesters against Mubarak were individuals of different ages, genders, social classes, and goals for the country. The organizers demanded freedom, social justice, and banded together against one corrupt force. And this is the foundation upon which Egypt will recover. Looking at the nation’s economy, many are confident that a new political system will follow with a better financial situation as a whole. It is important to recognize the strides Egypt is taking since the fall of Mubarak and it is important to note the small changes being made day by day. Although Egypt’s future is unclear for now, the demand for reform in the citizens of Egypt will continue to erupt until the proper government is restored, stability is returned in the economy, and the rights of the people are returned.

3 Responses to “Mubarak Stepped Down…What’s Next?”

  1. ahelman Says:

    I don’t think anyone will argue that Egypt certainly has a long way to go before becoming a stable country, but I really do feel as though Egypt will recover with grace. The country has been so unhappy and in such turmoil for so long, with multiple assassination attempts on Mubarak, that I can only hope that their state will improve. I think that Egyptian citizens need to be patient in waiting for conditions to improve, but I think that in due time, the world will be looking at an overall happier and more stable Egypt.

  2. rtaravella Says:

    In response to the first comment, I would have to agree. I really believe Egypt can recover as a nation and a people and come out of this stronger than ever. Perhaps these protests kicked up the level of intensity and passion that these citizens have for their homeland.
    On a side note, I enjoyed mcatts’s closing thesis which stated, “Although Egypt’s future is unclear for now, the demand for reform in the citizens of Egypt will continue to erupt until the proper government is restored, stability is returned in the economy, and the rights of the people are returned.”

  3. jstansberry Says:

    I wonder how the new leaders of Egypt will act in regards to relations with Israel and the U.S envolvement in that region.

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